Hold On, It's Not Over

A Blog about Children's Mental Health in Massachusetts

Getting to “culturally comfortable”

When programs strive to be culturally competent, the result should be that families are “culturally comfortable.” Most parents and youth can tell you whether it is easy and comfortable for them to be connected to and involved with a program. Feeling culturally comfortable helps families decide how they view a program, a worker or a service.

I first encountered the term “culturally comfortable” in the guide, Working with Families of Children in the Juvenile Justice and Corrections Systems. As Trina Osher and Barbara Huff note, some families may require a boost to become involved with their child’s services or program. They list some key strategies to provide that boost and providing culturally comfortable settings is a priority.

The term “culturally comfortable” has been cropping up in health and education settings for a number of years now. Many urban health centers have changed how they practice, finding new ways to share health information and deliver care. Some ask patients how they think a condition should be treated before offering their own recommendations. One pediatric practice in Virginia explored creating a “culturally comfortble” medical home. Some preschool educators have also been strong proponents of ensuring that their classrooms are culturally comfortable. Beverly Gulley and Nillofur Zobairi write that educators need to “know and understand the family’s cultural orientation to make a child feel comfortable and secure, and provide a sense of continuity.”

While cultural competence is a core value for both wraparound and creating a systems of care in children’s mental health, the notion of “culturally comfortable” settings or practice has yet to show up. I think it’s about time. Cultural competence is a rich, complex yet formal standard and most parents and youth would be hard pressed to say how close a setting or practice is to getting there. Yet they would be able to judge whether it was culturally comfortable. Feeling comfortable or uncomfortable is something we are all familiar with. Culturally comfortable settings, dialogues and practice make families feel welcome and respected.

Increasing cultural competence in the delivery of mental health services for children can help reduce disparities and increase access. But these results are frequently unknown to families, especially if the changes are gradual. Changing a setting, practice or dialogue so that it becomes more “culturally comfortable” is something that families can notice and determine for themselves. Determining whether that change is happening can empower parents and youth. Early in the family movement, parents often judged whether materials, programs or approaches were family friendly and later family dirven. So, too, can parents and youth figure out if materials or programs today are culturally comfortable.

Building an approach that is “culturally comfortable” starts with communication and awareness. Find out what the family values, who its members are, what the concerns and goals for its children may be. Ask families what matters to them. Find out what is private in a family and what is easily shared. Culture influences parenting and family behaviors, including meals, sleep, how to dress, interaction with both adults and other children, health care, how to show affection and respect, ways of celebrating and what occasions to celebrate. Many different family configurations are out there. Celebrate moms, dads, grandparents, extended family members, siblings, and others important to children. Model respect and show that customs, languages, cultures, and physical attributes different from your own are important and to be honored. Diversity in our society should be valued and enjoyed, not considered a threat to the values or lifestyle of any group.

Catherine Stakeman, Maine NASW, said that “becoming culturally comfortable between all cultures is a journey, and there is always room for improvement.” To make it happen, it must be everyone’s responsibility.

January 16, 2011 Posted by | children's mental health | , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , | 3 Comments

My top stories on children’s mental health in 2010 — what are yours?

We are all looking forward to 2011, making our resolutions and hoping, as we always do, for a better year. The end of the year is also the time when we look back before we look forward. There were many events in 2010 which will impact all of us who parent children with mental health needs or work with them and their families. Here are my picks for the top stories. What are yours?

#1. The health care reform law passed and began to offer protections for consumers across the country and the promise of coverage to the uninsured. The passage of the Affordable Care Act was signed into law by President Obama in March and some portions of the new law are already in effect including that young adults can remain on their parents’ insurance plans. The law requires mental health to be covered and people cannot be turned away or dropped from coverage because of pre-existing conditions. Although Massachusetts has had health care reform since 2006, many families have insurance that is solely regulated by federal law and this will change things for the better for them.

#2. Federal mental health parity was an under-the-radar story which will also have a major impact. The new federal mental health parity law, enacted in 2008, went into effect in 2010. For the first time, mental illness must be treated by insurance companies in the same way as other chronic conditions, like diabetes and hypertension. Parity is incredibly important to those affected by mental health condiditons, yet it was not widely noted while health care reform was debated. Again, while Massachusetts has had a mental health parity law, many families will only see changes under federal parity.

#3. Following an outbreak of LGBT teen suicides across the country , columnist Dan Savage launched the “It Gets Better” campaign in September, which lets gay teens know that if they hang in there, life will improve after high school. It’s a brilliant campaign and thousands of people (both celebrities and regular people) have posted personal stories on YouTube in an effort to offer hope to countless LGBT youth worldwide and shine a spotlight on the harm caused by bullies. LGBT youth are up to four times more likely to attempt suicide than their heterosexual peers according to the 2006 Massachusetts youth risk survey.

#4. The bullying and subsequent suicide of Phoebe Prince in January went from a local tragedy to an international media storm about bullying in schools. The tragedy of her death came just months after the suicide of 11-year-old Carl Walker-Hoover of Springfield and galvanized advocates, lawmakers and the media to advocate for change. In April, the Massachusetts Legislature passed a new law mandating that every school system in the Commonwealth come up with a plan by the end of the year for dealing with bullying issues.

#5. Another local event which captured national media attention was the trial and conviction of Rebecca Riley‘s mother (in January) and father (in September). Rebecca Riley was found dead on the floor of her home in 2006 from the combined effects of Clonidine, Depakote and other medications. Each of her parents was found guilty of murder. Many national and local reporters wrote and narrated stories that doubted the existence of mental health issues in very young children as well as the use of medication. Unsurprisingly, a complicated situation was pared down to a discussion of mental health, medication and young children.

#6. One of the most important stories of 2010 never got media coverage. The first full year of the implementation of Children’s Behavioral Health Intiative, although imperfect, continues to provide Massachusetts families with home and community based services on a previously unheard of scale. Nearly 70% of children and teens are receiving behavioral health screens at well-child visits, and almost 6500 children and youth have received care coordination with nearly 19,000 experiencing at least one of the new remedy services. Families report that they feel they are considered a partner in their child’s treatment and are particularly satisfied with the services provided by a family partner. What is striking is that while other states have created similar services, none has done it on such a scale. CBHI is available across the state to children with signicant mental health needs on MassHealth.

#7. In October, the Boston Globe reported that many children are deemed "too acute" by some hospitals when asked to consider an admission. Children and teens who are violent, hallucinate or have complicated psychiatric histories are most likely to be turned away. Just last week I heard a story of a teen waiting in an emergency room after being turned away from hospitals in Massaachusetts and two other states. Sounds like a story we’ll hear more of in 2011.

These are my top stories. Did I miss any or are there any that should not have made the list?

January 1, 2011 Posted by | children's mental health | , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , | 2 Comments